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Recovery Time After Accessory Navicular Surgery


Overview
The accessory navicular is an extra piece of bone or cartilage just above the arch on the inside of the foot. It sits next to the navicular tarsal, which gives it its name, where the posterior tibial tendon attaches to the bone before continuing to the underside of the arch. The little bone is a congenital anomaly, you are born with it. If the extra tissue doesn?t cause any problems, you may never know it is there. You can, however, develop the painful condition called accessory navicular syndrome. This occurs when the extra bone or the posterior tibial tendon surrounding it becomes irritated. Trauma from a sprain, friction from footwear, and overuse can all inflame the tissues.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes
An accessory navicular develops as a result of a congenital anomaly and is found more often in women. If the bone is large, it may rub against a shoe, causing pain. Because of its location, the posterior tibial tendon may pull on the bone during walking or running, causing the fibrous tissue that connects the accessory navicular to the navicular to tear and become inflamed.

Symptoms
Many people have accessory (?extra?) naviculars (figure 1) - a prominent extra bone extending from the navicular bone. Most accessory naviculars are completely asymptomatic. However, some individuals will develop pain on the inside of their midfoot. Pain may occur from the pressure of the shoe ware against the prominence, irritating either the bone itself or the fibrous junction where the accessory bone meets the regular navicular. Alternatively, the fibrous junction or interface may become painful as a result of tension applied by the posterior tibial tendon through its connection or insertion at that site. Often, individuals will be asymptomatic for years, however, a new pair of shoes or a change in their activity level can cause symptoms. The accessory navicular itself typically develops during adolescence, when the two areas of the navicular bone fail to fuse together.

Diagnosis
The diagnosis begins with a complete history and physical examination by your surgeon. Usually the condition is suggested by the history and the tenderness over the area of the navicular. X-rays will usually be required to allow the surgeon see the accessory navicular. Generally no other tests are required.

Non Surgical Treatment
If the foot becomes painful following a twisting type of injury and an X-ray reveals the presence of an accessory navicular bone, your doctor may recommend a period of immobilization in a cast or splint. This will rest the foot and perhaps allow the disruption between the navicular and accessory navicular to heal. Your doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory medication. Sometimes an arch support can relieve the stress on the fragment and decrease the symptoms. If the pain subsides and the fragment becomes asymptomatic, further treatment may not be necessary.

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment
If conservative measures How long do you grow during puberty? not seem to help, however, you may need to have surgery to make adjustments to the bump. This could include reshaping the little bone, repairing damage to the posterior tibial tendon, or even removing the accessory navicular altogether.

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برچسب: What do you do for a strained Achilles tendon?، How do I stretch my Achilles tendon?، What causes pain in the Achilles tendon?،
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Is Accessory Navicular Syndrome Uncomfortable


Overview
An accessory navicular bone is a common finding on many foot x-rays. Most accessory naviculars are asymptomatic. However, in some patients the prominent bone on the inside of foot will create discomfort, which leads to difficulty with shoe fitting. Alternatively, the fibrous union between the navicular bone and the ?extra? accessory part may become irritated and cause discomfort. Diagnosis is completed through physical examination and plain x-rays of the foot. Treatment is usually non-operative, often including a change in shoe wear and activity modification. However, patients that have ongoing symptoms once non-surgical treatments are tried, often consider surgery to remove the prominent accessory navicular and, if necessary, reattach the posterior tibial tendon.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes
It is commonly believed that the posterior tibial tendon loses its vector of pull to heighten the arch. As the posterior muscle contracts, the tendon is no longer pulling straight up on the navicular but must course around the prominence of bone and first pull medially before pulling upward. In addition, the enlarged bones may irritate and damage the insertional area of the posterior tibial tendon, making it less functional. Therefore, the presence of the accessory navicular bone does contribute to posterior tibial dysfunction.

Symptoms
One obvious problem with the accessory navicular is that it may be large and stick out from the inside of the foot. This can cause it to rub against shoes and so become quite painful. The fibrous connection between the accessory navicular and the navicualar, as well, is easy to injure, also leading to pain. This is kind of like a fracture, and such injuries cause the bone to move around too easily, leading to pain with activity. When the connection between the bones is injured in this way, the two bones do not always heal properly, so pain may continue unabated.

Diagnosis
The foot and ankle are prone to bony ?accessories? which usually have no accompanying symptoms. Accessory navicular syndrome What is the Ilizarov method? often diagnosed when an adolescent complains of pain in the foot. Girls are more susceptible than boys, and the condition is usually bilateral, occurring in both feet. Navicular accessory syndrome may be diagnosed when a trauma (foot or ankle sprain) aggravates the bone or tibial tendon, or when there is chronic irritation from footwear or overuse.

Non Surgical Treatment
The initial treatment approach for accessory navicular is non-operative. An orthotic may be recommended or the patient may undergo a brief period of casting to rest the foot. For chronic pain, however, the orthopedic surgeon removes the extra bone, a relatively simple surgery with a brief rehabilitation period and a very good success rate.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
If conservative care does not alleviate the problem then surgical intervention should be considered. The most common procedure for this condition is known as the Kidner procedure where a small incision is made over the navicular bone. The accessory navicular is identified and dissected free from the posterior tibial tendon. The posterior tibial tendon is then reattached to the remaining navicular bone.

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برچسب: What is the tendon at the back of your ankle?، How long does Achilles tendonitis last for?، What do you do for Achilles tendonitis?،
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